News from Suffolk County Council

Grass Cutting

One thing that you can guarantee every year is that grass will grow. It will grow at a different rate, depending upon the amount of rain that falls and the hours of sunshine – and the weather in general. The challenge for every local authority is managing that growth in a sensible way.

Locally, the verges adjacent to roads and visibility splays at junctions in rural areas are cut by Suffolk Highways, in accordance with a predefined schedule.  The cutting heads on the tractors that are used cut to a standard 1.2metre width and this ‘single swathe cut’ adjacent to main carriageways is carried out on all of the roads on that schedule.

In addition, visibility splays at junctions are generally cut back to a distance of 3m from the give way or stop lines, although this may be extended in some cases due to the geometry of the junction’s layout. All grass is cut to a length of 75mm.

When will the grass be cut in my area?

Suffolk Highways will cut verges adjacent to the A-road and B-road network twice during the grass growing season. The first cut will begin on May 2nd and will take around two weeks to complete. The second cut will begin on 11th July and will take a further two weeks to complete.  The verges on C-roads and unclassified roads will receive a single cut beginning on 6th June and will take around six weeks to complete.

How will the grass be cut?

Suffolk Highways has mobilised a fleet of seven tractors which will be working throughout May, June and July to ensure the full programme of cutting is completed on time. The tractors will display the Suffolk Highways livery together with the relevant high visibility markings and beacons. Operatives are fully trained and competent in the use of the machinery, as well as being familiar with the requirements of traffic management whilst on the network.

How will the service be managed?

Suffolk Highways will maintain daily contact with its supply chain partners ensuring any variations to the programme of works are identified quickly and efficiently. Services will be monitored to ensure daily productivity rates are kept as high as possible and the overall operation runs smoothly and efficiently.

Where can I find out when the grass in my area will be cut?

A programme of works can be found on the county council’s website at www.suffolk.gov.uk/grasscutting

Weed Spraying

As gardeners everywhere know, weeds take the very slightest opportunity to grow anywhere. So, if there is any organic material in the channel of a road, decayed leaves between kerbs or pockets of soil in cracks in a footway, weeds will grow there!

When will the weeds be treated in my area?

Weed treatments will be based upon two visits during the spring/summer season. However, an additional treatment may sometimes be necessary.  Suffolk Highways’ weed spraying programme started on Monday 18th April.

How are the weeds treated?

Weeds are treated by applying a low pressure herbicide spray with a hand-held lance.  Where possible, operatives will use a small all-terrain vehicle (quad bike) operated at a speed not exceeding 5 km/h. Footways and areas of restricted access will be treated on foot.

Where can I find out when the weeds in my area will be sprayed?

As with grass cutting, a programme of works can be found on the Suffolk Highways webpages on the county council’s website at www.suffolk.gov.uk/weed-control

Fostering Teenagers

 

Do you have a spare bedroom and experience in caring for children – have you ever thought about fostering?

 

Suffolk County Council is urgently looking for new foster carers, in particular for teenagers. Over half of the children in care are aged 11 or over, yet fewer people come forward to offer care for them. Therefore many teenagers may not be living with Suffolk carers, and will be away from friends, school and their local community. This is where you come in!

 

In return, the county council provide a highly competitive payment scheme, where you can receive up to £606 per week per child. The scheme allows career opportunities as you develop as a foster carer, recognising your skills, experience and the type of fostering you are offering.

 

If you think you could become a foster carer, come along to an information drop-in session. For more information visit: www.fosterandadopt.suffolk.gov.uk or call: (01473) 264800.

 

If you’re currently registered with another Fostering Provider, the county council would love to hear from you too as there are many benefits of moving to their Fostering Service. More information is available from www.fosterandadopt.suffolk.gov.uk

 

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